Monthly Archives: October 2016

Detroit and Soul Music History

Detroit and Soul Music History

They say the birth of soul came in the 1950s, when the parents of gospel and jazz came together to form a more contemporary and dance-friendly style of music.

The Motor City is no doubt the backbone of modern soul and R&B. It became a powerhouse and industry standard for soul music throughout the country, competing with Atlantic Records and Stax for chart-topping hits throughout the 60s.

BLACK EMPOWERMENT

The one thing that stands out about Detroit’s golden era of soul music, which isn’t covered very often in many music documentaries or biographies, is the reverberation and inspiration drawn during the civil rights era occurring alongside its timeline.

Soul music isn’t just a genre, its black poetry set to the sounds that emanate from the soul.

If that sounds like a profound statement to be made, well, it’s the only way to describe what anyone feels when they identify deeply with the lyrics, the passion, and the power that soul music provides to black culture.

LOSING TOUCH IN DETROIT

As with practically every music genre in history, once soul music began to dominate the charts and the money showed record labels, the music scene began to fill with copycats and water-down imitations, inspired by the pop movement craze overseas in the UK.

They began using elements of Motown’s greatness to appeal to wider audiences, i.e. white suburbia, even though soul music was very popular with nearly every demographic.

As the inner cities began to transform, gentrification and appropriation of black culture began to push Detroit communities to the breaking point, spurring the infamous Detroit riots in 1967. The destruction spelt the end of the once dominant and influential city of Detroit, as well as the golden era of soul for Motown Records. During their final years, Motown churned out, arguable, their most soulful and raw records of their time, with lyrics laced in civil rights violence, suffocating poverty, calls for peace and unity; even Marvin’s soothing voice could not turn the tides.

THE TRANSFORMATION OF DETROIT SOUL

After the destruction and fall of a city that lead the country in both music and manufacturing, there came a new era of soul music, even with Motown now relegated to Hollywood pop hits. In Detroit, new eras of electronic music were giving way. Dance and techno exploded on the scene, the younger generations’ music didn’t sound the same, but it shared that same spark of music pioneering that Detroit is infamous for.

NEW TECHNOLOGY, SAME SOUL

Along with the new era of electronics brought more tools to produce, birthing the next major black culture of hip-hop. Hip hop is a culture that is derived from soul, the poetry is sped up, but the elements of expression and raw emotion are all there. It didn’t happen until the late 90s, but Detroit officially gave birth to a new genre of soul music, dubbed “Neo-soul”, which was created from the sounds of the late hip-hop producer James “Dilla” Dewitt Yancey.

His heavy sampling of classic soul records and basement sounds of the hard-hitting 808 drums is his signature, which left big impressions on soulful R&B singers, like Lauren Hill, Erykah Badu, Jill Scott, and Amel Larrieux. Who partially owe their success to his creative genius and love for Detroit soul.

Detroit is a city that is a testament to how powerful music is, as long as it comes from the soul, no matter how dire situations may be. Inside, we all have a drum in our chest that connects us all to the sound of music.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9469703

The Roots of Funky

The Roots of Funky

The Funky guitar is one of the things that I like to play, very much.

This style is very dynamic and gives that extra spice to already solid drum grooves (and basslines). Since the late 40s the rhythmic guitar styles evolved in many different ways, one of them being the Rhythm and Blues style, that, mixed with Soul, Blues and a little bit of Jazz, gave the grounds for Funky Music.

When we say Funky the first Artist who comes to mind is James Brown.

This man, with the musical help of Jimmy Nolen (who also started in the late 40s and had already played with the innovator Johnny Otis) put “Funky music” on the map, as one of the most important music genres since the late 60s to present day..

James Brown had another great guitarist, Phelps “Catfish” Collins- who, with his brother “Bootsy” -incredible bass player- contributed to many, important songs (Sex Machine being the most famous one-and Superbad the one with the most amazing, nervous, dynamic and full of positive vibes-rhytmic arrangements )-

I want to write a small list of some guitarists who were important to shape this sound: Freddie Stone (a real Master of pre-funky guitar, playing with a small jazz/soul/rnr band) best known for his role as co-founder, guitarist, and vocalist in the band Sly and the Family Stone, Bo Diddley (mainly Blues but his hard, edgy rhythmic sound was very influential ) Paul Jackson of The Temptations (whose “Papa was a Rolling Stone” wha wha rhythmic parts and bluesy licks/fills are totally priceless).

As most of you know (I suppose so) a part of Funky music speeded up the tempo-just a little bit- and evolved in Disco (and years later, in House music) with great bands like Earth wind and Fire and their guitarist Al Mc Kay, or Kool & The Gang.

From the late 70s, Nile Rodgers with Chic is “the man”. He’s of the best musicians and riff-makers- since 1978 to present day. I mean, this man wrote songs like ” Everybody Dance”- a track that uses amazing and difficult to play chords -that, to be honest, even if you play guitar for years, you can still hav problems to play… incredible…

Nile produced a lot of cool songs, with Chic, and, later, for other artists like Sheila B Devotion “Spacer” – David Bowie “Let’s dance and also Duran Duran and Madonna.

I also want to mention Larry Carlton, who, a part from being a great jazz guitarist, played the wha wha guitar vamp-and the all guitar part in the main theme of Enter The Dragon (Lalo Schifrin).

.There are countless other examples, and I will def cover them in another article very soon.

Funky, Soul, Blues, RnB! Black people influenced a good 80 percent of modern music! And it’s all amazing!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9479918

The World’s Top 10 Best Jazz Guitarists of All Time

The World’s Top 10 Best Jazz Guitarists of All Time

The following is a brief list that includes some of the world’s best jazz guitarists of all time. Whether you’re an aspiring jazz musician or just someone who appreciates the music, this list is for you.

Charlie Christian

Charles “Charlie” Christian was an American jazz guitarist who lived from 1916-1942. He is credited with bringing the jazz guitar out of the rhythm section and into the world of solo instrumentals. He was called the best improvisational talent of the swing era and one of the founding fathers of bebop, while single-handedly influencing nearly every other artist on our list. He was so diverse that he eventually was inducted into the Rock and Roll of Fame for his early influence.

Wes Montgomery

As the jazz music world continued to gain popularity, more artists emerged. Among them was Wes Montgomery, who was greatly influenced by Charlie Christian. In fact, he learned Christian’s solo and often played them note for note. Montgomery would eventually develop powerful techniques and lines for his own solos which would make him one of the most important and best jazz guitarists of all time. He later would be imitated for generations of jazz musicians.

Jim Hall

Improvisation was Jim Hall’s preference for developing new music. Hall discovered there was more to jazz than bebop, and eventually drew the attention of some of the best musicians in the 60’s including the Sonny Rollins’ band and Bill Evans, among others. His style and technique is one of the best seen in jazz music.

Freddie Green

We couldn’t go this entire list without mentioning William “Freddie” Green. While his journey with music started with the banjo, Green went on to play in clubs throughout New York as a teenager and quickly discovered his love for jazz guitar. He is known for his complicated rhythm guitar technique that blended perfectly with Big Band music.

Joe Pass

Joe Pass also emerged in the 60’s and went down as one of the best solo jazz guitarists of all time. With his extensive knowledge of lines, he created a reputation that continues to inspire artists to this day.

B.B. King

B.B. King was an American singer and jazz guitarist, and also one of the most famous artists to ever grace the American continent. There isn’t much we can say about B.B. that hasn’t already been said, but what we can point out is that he is considered one of the most influential jazz and blues musicians of all time. And will be for the foreseeable future.

Django Reinhardt

Belgian-born French jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt, is thought to be one of the best jazz guitarists of all time. Reinhardt was the father of what is known today as “hot jazz” and goes down as one of the best jazz guitarists of all time.

George Benson

Benson was born a jazz guitarist artist. He started off playing soul jazz and eventually broke onto the pop scene. He used a similar technique to that of Reinhardt, but was himself an incredible artist.

Larry Carlton

Larry Carlton, like George Benson, started playing guitar at a young age. Later in life he would play with the likes of Billy Joel, Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones and many more. His work within the jazz world is recognized the world over, and his songs continue to provide music for millions.

John Scofield

John Scofield was an American jazz-rock guitarist and composer. His work enabled him to work with everyone from Pat Metheny to Miles Davis. His talents spanned genres including funk, jazz-fusion and rock.
There you have it. Our picks for the best jazz guitarists in history.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9516844

Where to Find Free Music for Your Videos

Where to Find Free Music for Your Videos

Copyright holders, along with YouTube (to use a well-known example), have, within the last few years, been cracking down on people using copyrighted music without permission. Tributes & covers of songs, of course, have been somewhat “riding the fence” of legality, where the artists gives their due credit to the composer/lyricist in question and provides a disclaimer in their video description that says “this is not my work, I do not own the rights to this music,” and they generally get left alone, more or less.

Obviously, though, not all videos with music in them are covers or tributes. Other videos are sometimes sales pitches, or vlogs featuring meditation music. Whatever the reason for including music at all, it’s something of an embarrassment for a video creator if they have to remove or replace the music in their video because the music was copyrighted, and the creator had their video monetized. And since not every content creator out there earns lots of money from their videos, they likely can’t afford to pay the royalty fees required of them, so they’re forced to remove the music.

Finding Free Music

But not everyone is a musician and/or lyricist with the ability to compose their own works. Nor does everyone have a musician pal at their disposal, whether that musician gets paid for ditties and jingles or not. So it’s often up to the one creating the video to find either free music, or at the very least, royalty-free tracks. But where to find such music? And is the free music you’d find of high quality?

After all, it used to be that most stock music libraries didn’t have music that was very good quality, and some music libraries are still like this if the people uploading tracks have used cheap equipment and synthesizers where the built-in digital sound banks aren’t very accurately sampled & reproduced (this tends to happen with lower-end electronic keyboards).

However, thanks to the advent of MP3s and more professional-grade composition & editing software, among other similar advances, most stock music libraries these days often have truly stunning tracks available in a wide variety of genres, so you’re not stuck with just a few samples here and there of one style, and a lot of samples in another style, and nothing to speak of in any other genre.

What’s the Difference?

Now, you might be wondering what the difference is between “royalty-free” and completely free, when it comes to stock music libraries.

“Royalty-free” means that you pay a one-time fee for a track and you don’t have to continually pay royalties to the composer for the entire time you use their works, and there is usually some sort of usage license that detail how you can use the music once you pay the fee. Completely free music is simply that: It that has no upfront usage fee and is normally licensed under the “Creative Commons” license.

When you go looking for free music, you’ll want to take a look at the types of music licenses available, as each licensing company has different stipulations as to how the music they have on offer can be used.

It’s worth your time and energy to go looking for free music. It saves the hassle and embarrassment of having to remove an otherwise copyrighted track and replace it, plus you never know what amazing, original music can be found at reasonable prices.

Look for a site that has a wide range of music genres. It’s easy to find the right music when you have categories like alternative rock, New Age/Ethereal, Country and so forth. Look for a music site is entirely free or that charges a minimal fee for commercial applications.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9522321